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CONTRACT MANAGEMENT EMPLOYMENT ON-BOARDING

Contract management employment on-boarding is  now service their clients with the full employment on-boarding. We supply the technical service for not only the applicant Pre Employment Screening, but can supply the digital Employment contracts and Healthcare Questionnaires totally online through our specific system with full electronic signatures, electronic audit trails.

This ensures that the client knows fully that the on-boarding of their applicants are totally regulated and confirmed.

Contract management

 On-boarding is a service that assists alongside our Pre Employment Screening Service.
 
This allows our clients total peace of mind that we can process the full applicant on-boarding from Employment contracts, Pre Employment Screening and Healthcare Employment Questionnaires. This ensures that every aspect of the employment is covered prior to them starting. Our clients use this service so Candidate Vetting take control of the total employment on-boarding management, saving them time and money.
 
Our digital contract management service for Permanent, Temporary, Contract hires and Healthcare Questionnaires uses state-of-the-art technology for a fast, hassle free and seamless online process, including legally-binding electronic signature system processes.
 
We have fully trained consultants that are on hand to negotiate and liaise with the applicant every step of the way to their new career with your company.
 
Using our expertise combined with the latest technology it ensures a hassle free enjoyable applicant experience.

Contractor and Temporary Hires

We provide our client’s with full consultation to ensure that the appropriate contracts are in place between the applicant and the hiring company or agency.

These contracts reflect the nature of the engagement and are in line with regulatory guidelines such as Employment Agencies Act,  Agency Worker Regulations etc.

We ensure Contract and Temporary hires are legally contractually bound by a code of conduct as detailed in their contract.

Pre Placement Healthcare Questionnaire’s

The purpose of a pre-placement Healthcare Questionnaires is to ensure that candidates are fit for the job requirements and to assess any pre-existing health conditions in relation to their impact on the job or the impact of the job upon their health condition.

This ensures that the employer can make reasonable adjustments to the method of working or add in a particular facilities.

The Equality Act 2010 came into force in October 2010 and places some limits on the questions an employer can ask about health or disability during the recruitment process.

The level of need for personal health information and the level of health assessment will be determined by the functions of the job role.

Please contact a member of the sales team to discuss this further on 0333 3326200

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Why it may be important to Screen your Existing Employees:

When businesses consider vetting services it is usually to screen potential employees as part of a pre-employment background check.  However, there are also very valid reasons for screening your existing employees as we are about to explore.

The main reason for using employment screening is to corroborate personal data and identity.  It is very useful to have this information when hiring new members of staff as you can verify that the individual is who they claim to be and also that they have the right skills and experience to complement your organisation.

The requirement for this verification and peace of mind doesn’t stop once you have recruited someone on a permanent basis.  Some organisations will hire employee vetting services to periodically screen their employees to help manage risk within the company.

Promotion, for instance, is the perfect example of a time when employee screening can be adopted.  If an existing employee will be taking on a higher paid role, with new expertise and experience required, the organisation may wish to verify this data to confirm that the individual has the skills required to perform this new role efficiently.  The background checks performed on the individual at the point of hiring may not be sufficient to address the criteria associated with the new position and so the most sensible option is to carry out the screening process again just to ensure that everything is as it should be.

When employees take on new responsibilities, either as part of their existing role or when being promoted to a new role, the company will have new expectations of them.  If certain qualifications or professional memberships are required for this role, screening the employee will confirm that certifications are in place and that memberships have not lapsed.

Just because an employee has been initially cleared for employment, does not mean they will not pose a risk to the business at some point in the future and that is why ongoing screening of existing employees is so important.

Employers need to ensure that their employees meet the required standards of the job and that they do not pose a threat, not just to others but also to themselves.  Employee screening can help to eliminate this risk and bring peace of mind to business owners and managers in terms of their legal and financial position as well as their reputation.

It goes without saying that employers need to communicate their intentions to employees if they wish them to get on board with the process and also that they alleviate any concerns about confidentiality by explaining who will have access to screening checks and where the information will be stored.

To find out more about the benefits of screening your existing employees call us and we will chat over the different screening services that would suit your business.

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Illegal Working How Employers can Stay compliant

Illegal working How employers can stay compliant

Burger chain Byron made headlines last month when the Home Office arrested a number of illegal workers. Given the tougher new immigration rules now in place, what are employers’ roles and responsibilities when it comes to right to work checks?

The prevention of illegal working has been at the forefront of media coverage in recent weeks. On 12 July 2016, the Immigration Act 2016 came into force introducing new criminal penalties for individuals working in breach of their visa conditions and increasing the penalties for employers.

Just two weeks later, the Home Office arrested a number of employees of burger chain Byron, who were suspected of working illegally.
The Home Office regularly undertakes these compliance visits but they rarely get noticed. Byron – on the other hand – is a popular high street name with George Osborne, the former Chancellor of the Exchequer, among its fans. In retrospect, press coverage seems inevitable.

Most of the media attention rested on the fact that Byron had agreed to cooperate with the Home Office. This was always going to be a tricky balancing act. I imagine that Byron takes its duty of care to employees very seriously but, of course, also needed to follow the law.

It appears the Home Office had intelligence that criminal immigration offences were being committed on Byron’s premises.
Officials have powers to enter and search premises to investigate possible immigration offences and if they need to use these powers they will. In turn, we can assume that Byron would not have wanted to have obstructed a criminal investigation.

They would also have been mindful that cooperation with the authorities is a relevant factor in determining the extent of a civil penalty if illegal working is discovered. That may not have been a driving consideration for Byron, but it is important.

Despite the number of individuals arrested for working illegally, it is understood Byron will not face any criminal or civil penalties because they correctly carried out all the requisite right to work checks and cooperated with the Home Office.

So with the spotlight on employers, what is illegal working? And what should employers do if they themselves uncover some of their employees do not have the right to work or are contacted by the Home Office in relation to this point? How can employers make sure they act within the law but also in the interest of their employees?

What is illegal working?

Illegal working goes beyond simply not having the right to work in the UK. That will typically mean starting by checking a prospective employee has a valid visa, but you also need to check the terms of their visa.

A classic and often overlooked example is the work rights held by Tier 4 General student visa holders.
The level of course a Tier 4 General student is enrolled on will dictate the number of hours they are permitted to work, if at all. It is therefore crucial that employers are able to track the number of hours worked per week.

For example, a Tier 4 General student working 21 hours a week instead of the permitted 20 hours a week during term time would be working illegally.

What is the employer’s role?

You must conduct a right to work check for all employees either prior to or on their first day of employment. This is done by checking a document which is acceptable for showing permission to carry out the work in question.

The employer is then required to make and retain a clear copy of the relevant documents, recording the date of the check and retaining the copy on file securely.

It is important to remember that you are not expected to be a forgery expert. If you have an employee who has given a false document, you will only be required to pay a civil penalty if it is reasonably apparent that it is false.

In the Byron example, it is reported that they had been presented with forged documents, but they still benefited from the statutory excuse.

What should I do if I uncover illegal working?

In the event that a company uncovers illegal working by an existing employee, it should immediately take steps to bring the employment to an end. In doing so, an employer should always seek legal advice in relation to employment rights.

Ending the employment has now become even more critical as, with the introduction of the Immigration Act 2016, an employer will commit a criminal offence with up to five years’ imprisonment if they know or have reasonable cause to believe that they are employing an illegal worker.

What if the Home Office advises me an employee is working illegally?

In some instances, such as fraudulent documentation, the first time an employer may know that an employee is potentially working illegally is when they are contacted by the Home Office.

Where this happens the employer should immediately check as to whether or not they hold the appropriate evidence of the right to work checks having taken place. This is critical, as it will afford the employer a defence in regards to any potential civil penalty.

From there, the employer should engage with the Home Office in relation to the provision of documentation and relevant information wherever possible. They should also commit to stopping employment where such evidence is provided by the Home Office.

It is possible that the case may involve a criminal offence, so cooperation with the Home Office is always recommended.
This is particularly important where a statutory defence cannot be established. Cooperation with the Home Office is a relevant factor in determining the financial level of the civil penalty.

However, employers should always seek prior advice on these points to ensure they are not placing themselves in a contentious position in regards to data protection and employment law.

Article written By Lee Bartlett on 15 Aug 2016 (Personnel Today)

How can I ensure we are compliant?

Contact candidate Vetting on 0333 3326200 or visit the site on www.cvonline.co.uk

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Leadsom and CV-gate

Before she stepped out of the Conservative party leadership race earlier this week, Andrea Leadsom had already attracted unwanted attention to her CV, where it was claimed she had lied about her previous experience. How can hiring managers and HR professionals avoid falling foul of CV lies?

It may not have been the final nail in her coffin – arguably, that might have been the claims of maternal superiority – but, for sure, “CV-gate” contributed significantly to the demise of Andrea Leadsom’s ambitions to be Prime Minister.

Background checking resources

 

While the story around the validity of Leadsom’s career history may have been a shock to much of the general public, it’s an all too familiar challenge faced by businesses up and down the country, large or small.

We all know characters who exaggerate the truth, but not many of us would cross the line and present these embellishments as fact, or would we?

Numerous organisations have researched the occurrence of CV inaccuracies. The result largely depends on where you stand and how you view the difference between an acceptable exaggeration and an outright lie.

In a recent survey of more than 2000 candidates, job board CV Library states that the volume of UK-based candidates lying on their CV is more than 28% – with almost 10% saying that the lie was “significant.”

Perhaps more interestingly, 75% said that they believed it was the company’s responsibility to uncover lies during the ongoing interview process as opposed to the candidate being honest. And if this is how many admit to it, how many of our stellar candidates are “keeping schtum” and living with their lie?

The challenge

It is tough. You like the person you have just interviewed, you want to believe what they tell you and you want them to be everything they say they are. So what can you do to ensure that your gut feeling is on the money?

There are a few ways in which you can get to the bottom of whether that applicant can or cannot do what they say. Many sectors rely on testing or assessments. Within finance, particularly investments, it’s not uncommon to expect modelling tests and case studies as part of the recruitment process.

IT and programming-related roles will often require a series of software tests. Both of these will at least give an indication of a new employee’s technical capability, but what else do they provide? What was Tony like to get on with? How did Emily perform under pressure? None of these critical questions are answered with traditional assessments or a quick read of a (possibly misleading) CV.

You would think that in this internet-dominated age it would be far easier to identify these exaggerations or lies. In fact, the data overload may well be making it more difficult.

With the rise of self-regulated social media sites such as LinkedIn, anyone can claim to be pretty much whoever or whatever they like.

They may be caught out at some stage, but by then the damage is often done – for the employer, in particular. If we rewind 20 or more years to the dawn of the Internet era, ironically employers often had even more access to relevant information than they do today.

It was the norm to speak to past employers quite openly about the applicant and they were often happy to dedicate time to this. In the fast-moving age of Amazon, Uber and online banking, there’s less appetite to follow up on these “non-essentials”.

And, with people moving location and generally travelling further than ever to go to or even find work, there is much less of a personal link then there has been in the past. With a less transient working population, more businesses relied on personal recommendations and referrals.

Background checks fall short

But what about the myriad of background-checking businesses that organisations can rely on to separate the wheat from the chaff? In many instances, they just don’t cut it.

Taking the example of Mrs Leadsom, I doubt very much that she has a criminal record (that’s one routine check passed). I also doubt that she has a particularly troubling credit score (another check passed). And I even doubt that she lied about her job title and dates of employment (yet another).

However, when it comes to actually having the responsibilities she claimed and performing the tasks she spoke of, I can’t be so sure. No one aside from Leadsom herself and the people she worked with directly could know this for definite.

So, the simple solution is to speak to the people she worked with and clear this mess up. Get our facts straight. Assemble some sort of verifiable, accurate career history for Leadsom. Reassemble her reputation. Simple, right? Well no, not really, and here’s why…

Businesses shy away from the truth; they are scared of being sued even though the risk is far lower than perceived. Market perception is that simple data checks are adequate even though we have just shown that often they are not.

Once upon a time we would call up a friend or acquaintance in a competitor who knew someone who worked with the potential employee. But despite us now being able to do pretty much anything on a smartphone, technology has been very slow to catch up when it comes to digging up any dirt on candidates.

Get the facts right

So what does HR need to be doing differently to mitigate the risks of a fraudulent hire? Quite simply, it needs to ensure that the business gets the facts on its potential new hires.

In much the same way as the HR function should be ensuring that the business uses the most appropriate payroll, absence, grievance processes and software, it must also enable the business to make the right hiring decisions in a timely manner.

Luckily, things are changing and technology is catching up with the increasing necessity and demand in this area. You can now simply and quickly check someone’s background without risking prosecution or annoying those involved in the process.

So, can we ever be 100% sure about who we’re hiring? No, probably not, but we can certainly get to the bottom of blatant lies and bogus claims whilst arming hiring managers with data-driven facts to form a decision.

The trick is to make reference-collecting easier for all parties while avoiding a PR nightmare and a hefty dose of embarrassment. Take Mrs Leadsom’s word for it.

Story by: By Ed Allnutt on 13 Jul 2016

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Changes to law on employing illegal workers come into force 12 July

New rules on the offence of employing illegal workers and other changes under the Immigration Act 2016 take effect on 12 July 2016.

Employers will be guilty of an offence if they employ an illegal worker while having “reasonable cause to believe that the employee is disqualified from employment” because of their immigration status.

The change is intended to “make it easier to prove the offence”, according to a Government fact sheet on the Act.

Prior to 12 July, the Government had to show that an employer knew it was employing an illegal worker in order to prosecute for the offence.

The offence applies regardless of whether the worker is employed as an employee or as an apprentice, and whether the worker is employed through a written or an oral agreement.

Employers convicted under this offence may face a large financial penalty, and/or a maximum prison sentence of five years (up from two years).

The changes are part of the Government’s broader initiative to crack down on illegal working.

Other changes taking effect on 12 July include expanded powers of immigration officers to search premises, including workplaces, and to confiscate evidence of immigration and employing illegal worker offences.

A new offence of illegal working (for employees) will also take effect on 12 July.

This offence carries a maximum sentence of six months’ imprisonment. Individuals may also be subject to a fine.

Additionally, the Act creates a new Director of Labour Market Enforcement role to oversee authorities that enforce minimum standards for workers, such as enforcement of the national minimum wage.

Sections in the Act relevant to employers that do not yet have implementation dates – and that may require additional regulations before they come into force – include:

  • a visa levy (immigration skills charge) on employers who sponsor Tier 2 skilled migrant workers;
  • a requirement for customer-facing public-sector workers to speak fluent English (or Welsh if they are in Wales); and
  • a new power to close premises for up to 48 hours where a business employs illegal migrants.

“The UK’s vote to leave the EU on 23 June does not impact on the changes under the Act,” says Qian Mou, employment law editor at XpertHR.

“For example, the immigration skills charge will apply to tier 2 sponsored migrants only. Currently, most EEA and Swiss nationals do not require sponsorship in order to live and work in the UK.”

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British Standard 7858 Screening Code of Practice Changes

Over the past 12 years there has been many changes in the area of Vetting and Screening with compliance legislation being introduced to make sure the standards are maintained.

In this article we’ll look at BS7858:2012 – the standard for vetting of people employed in the Fire and Security sector.

April 2013, British Standard 7858:2006 was stopped and replaced with British Standard 7858:2012 ‘Security screening of staff employed in a Fire and Security environment – Code of Practice’. The new standard replaced the former code with an updated view of how security employees should be vetted.

Updating this standard was seen as a really good thing in the Fire and Security industry however companies still face a massive challenge to not only vet their staff to the correct standard, but provisionally screen their applicants in a fast and compliant manner. Candidate Vetting ensure that your staff are screened to the BS 7858 standard correctly but also supply a certified provisional screening certificate certified within the NSI and SSAIB standards within 96 hrs of receipt of an applicant. This ensures that your staff are able to work out on site completely legal within hours of starting.

The requirements of BS7858 include;

  • 5 years of employment verification
  • 6 year credit search
  • Proof of ID, Verified and validated
  • Proof of address, verified and validated
  • UK right to work checks
  • X 2  character references
  • Criminal Checks
  • SIA Licence verification and validation (If required)
  • Gap analysis and confirmation

Having a single screening standard across the whole of the UK is a massive move forward as it means that Fire and Security staff are fully compliant checked under one high standard checked and employers can have assurance that the people working for them and their clients are fully compliant and trustworthy.

 

With Gaps in the employment the standard actually requires documentary evidence such as utility bills, bank statements and correspondence including 1 character reference covering the gap in the employment.

It is essential that security staff are fully screened.

Staff vetting is a complex admin issue to find and collate all of the information needed and vet your staff correctly. The problem for the smaller companies is they dont have the facilities and time to perform checks such as Credit checks and criminality checks.

Vetting of your staff is not a simple process, especially for the smaller companies that dont have HR functions. Outsourcing your Security screening to a company such as candidate Vetting ensures that your staff are legally compliant, but guarantees 100% pass audit on all of your external audits such as NSI and SSAIB.

Candidate Vetting are certified with the National security Inspectorate and the SSAIB, along with being members of the BSI.

PrintSecurity Screening

 

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Withdrawing job offers: the risks and how to limit them

Can you withdraw a job offer once it has been made? We look at the risks employers face if they change their recruitment plans.

Sometimes, employers need to withdraw an offer of a job. The hiring situation may change because of a general recruitment freeze, a restructure within the organisation or a change of management. Or perhaps the funding for the post has been withdrawn.

Alternatively, the employer may become aware that the selected candidate is not suitable after all.

Job offers can be withdrawn after they are made, but there are risks associated with doing this; withdrawing an offer because circumstances have changed looks like bad planning and could affect the employer’s reputation. Furthermore, the employee may be able to bring a tribunal claim for breach of contract.

When is the contract of employment formed?

An employment contract is formed once an unconditional job offer is made and accepted. If the employer withdraws an unconditional job offer once it has been accepted, it is effectively terminating the contract and could be liable for damages for the individual’s loss.

Even though the individual has not started working, there will be a notice period due – just as with other terminations. Damages could amount to what the individual would have received if the employer had given proper notice – including any pay and benefits due if he or she would have started work during the notice period.

What if recruitment plans change?

If an employer’s recruitment plans change due to business needs and it has to withdraw job offers, it should notify the recruits as soon as possible to try to limit the damage and enable them to mitigate their potential loss.

The selected candidate might not have resigned from the current employer yet. Or, if they have, they may still be able to ask for their old job back – the sooner this is done the better.

Further, any notice period for termination of the contract is more likely to end before the individual would otherwise have started work, if the employer withdraws the job offer quickly.

Obviously, if the employer is withdrawing the job offer in these circumstances, it should explain its reasons and apologise.

Pre-recruitment checks and job offers

Most job offers are conditional on the new recruit satisfying certain conditions. For example, the selected candidate may need to provide references or evidence of qualifications, or they may need to demonstrate their right to work in the UK.

If the individual does not satisfy one or all of those requirements, the employer can withdraw the job offer without being liable for damages.

However, if it does not make clear that the job offer is conditional, and then withdraws the offer because the recruit has not satisfied one of its requirements, this will amount to a breach of contract and the employer may be liable for damages.

Therefore, offers of employment should make absolutely clear that they are conditional on certain requirements being met. Failure to do so can be costly.

By Clio Springer on 16 May 2016 (Personnel Today)

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The 10 Dos and Donts of Conducting Employee Background Checks

Most people might find it unseemly were you to run background checks on your potential dates prior to asking them out. But the same does not hold true when hiring a new employee. While taking a chance on a blind date might result in a bad evening, there’s absolutely no doubt that making a wrong hiring decision can haunt your company, your other employees and your client base.

That doesn’t even take into consideration the cost and time expended in finding a replacement for that poor hiring decision and in a worst-case scenario, the potential for a lawsuit should the employee that you failed to properly vet prove to be unethical or dishonest.

The practice is so important that nearly seven out of 10 organizations (69 percent) claim they conduct criminal background checks on all job candidates, according to a 2012 background check survey from the Society for Human Resources Management. That survey shows another 18 percent conduct such checks on select job finalists and only 14 percent say they don’t research candidates for criminal records.

 Chris Dyer, founder of PeopleG2, a leading provider of human capital due diligence services, understands the complex challenges inherent to talent management decisions. What he offers here are his Top 10 list of dos and don’ts when it comes to protecting your business against bad hires.

Do be broad and thorough. Look at an expansive spectrum of information, which includes consideration of an applicant’s education, employment, and criminal history, driving history, social media and so much more. Companies lose great candidates when they look at only one specific item. They may also be the target of an Equal Employment Opportunities Commission (EEOC) investigation for excluding applicants who have a criminal records, no matter what the charge or how long ago the offense occurred.

Do follow the law. Based on the way the background check is conducted, you will be required to have a legal release form completed by the applicant, inform that person of his/her rights, and provide that applicant with a copy of the report, as well as adverse actions communications.

Don’t bend the laws. There are so many opportunities to conduct a background check the wrong way, which means as an employer, you must take great care to follow the rules. The rules concerning background checks vary based on federal, state, local and job-specific laws. Check with your company’s legal counsel if you’re unsure of how to proceed.

Do be consistent. Ensure that the process for all applicants is consistent. Two applicants applying for the same job should have the same searches and investigations run on them. Different job types may require different levels of investigation, but for the same job title, make sure you keep your process uniform to avoid charges of discrimination.

Don’t fail to communicate. If and when you find something on a background check that may impact the decision to hire an applicant, you should — at a minimum — engage in a conversation with the applicant. So many misconceptions, mistakes, and reporting errors can be resolved by conducting that face-to-face communication.

Do locate patterns. Positive and negative patterns are the best way to evaluate your applicant. A single good act or bad act should not be the defining measure of a person or of their job ability. Considering consistent patterns of behavior is a defensible way for employers to make hiring decisions.

Don’t seek out only the negative. Background checks are inherently viewed as a way to pinpoint negative information. Use a background check to also locate positives that will help you choose between two well-qualified candidates.

Do use a professional agency to process your background check. Great screening companies will do a far better job of locating the information you want. They have the experience and processes to be accurate and efficient. They also prevent you from viewing data that might be a violation of state or federal law.

Don’t run a limited search yourself. You can’t find everything on-line. So much of the concrete — legally obtained — data for a background check can only be conducted by a licensed background check firm.

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Withdrawing job offers: the risks and how to limit them

Can you withdraw a job offer once it has been made? We look at the risks employers face if they change their recruitment plans.

Sometimes, employers need to withdraw an offer of a job. The hiring situation may change because of a general recruitment freeze, a restructure within the organisation or a change of management. Or perhaps the funding for the post has been withdrawn.

Alternatively, the employer may become aware that the selected candidate is not suitable after all.

Job offers can be withdrawn after they are made, but there are risks associated with doing this; withdrawing an offer because circumstances have changed looks like bad planning and could affect the employer’s reputation. Furthermore, the employee may be able to bring a tribunal claim for breach of contract.

When is the contract of employment formed?

An employment contract is formed once an unconditional job offer is made and accepted. If the employer withdraws an unconditional job offer once it has been accepted, it is effectively terminating the contract and could be liable for damages for the individual’s loss.

Even though the individual has not started working, there will be a notice period due – just as with other terminations. Damages could amount to what the individual would have received if the employer had given proper notice – including any pay and benefits due if he or she would have started work during the notice period.

What if recruitment plans change?

If an employer’s recruitment plans change due to business needs and it has to withdraw job offers, it should notify the recruits as soon as possible to try to limit the damage and enable them to mitigate their potential loss.

The selected candidate might not have resigned from the current employer yet. Or, if they have, they may still be able to ask for their old job back – the sooner this is done the better.

Further, any notice period for termination of the contract is more likely to end before the individual would otherwise have started work, if the employer withdraws the job offer quickly.

Obviously, if the employer is withdrawing the job offer in these circumstances, it should explain its reasons and apologise.

Most job offers are conditional on the new recruit satisfying certain conditions. For example, the selected candidate may need to provide references or evidence of qualifications, or they may need to demonstrate their right to work in the UK.

If the individual does not satisfy one or all of those requirements, the employer can withdraw the job offer without being liable for damages.

However, if it does not make clear that the job offer is conditional, and then withdraws the offer because the recruit has not satisfied one of its requirements, this will amount to a breach of contract and the employer may be liable for damages.

Therefore, offers of employment should make absolutely clear that they are conditional on certain requirements being met. Failure to do so can be costly.

By Clio Springer on 16 May 2016 in Employer branding.

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BS7858 Screenings

Security Industry Checks (BS7858 Standard).

Cost: £70.00 for British Standard 7858 2012.

BS7858 Screenings with Candidate Vetting .. We are the highest accredited Security screening company in the UK and are certified to National Security Inspectorate Silver Status, SSAIB Certified.  We provide the fastest and most cost effective Security screening solution under the British Standard 7858:2012 Screening (BS7858 Screening).

BS7858 Screening concerns the vetting and Pre-Employment Screening of persons employed or to be employed in an environment where the security and safety of people, property or goods is a requirement of the employing organisation.  We screen all your staff to BS7858 NSI Silver Status level.

Crucially, Provisional screening certificates are issued within 96 hours of the initial application, which enables quick on-site deployment of your staff ensuring no downtown on staff placements.

We also guarantee 100% pass audit on all your BS7858 applicant screenings.  Our screening reports are compliant with all SIA, SSAIB and NSI audits.

If your company is involved in the CCTV, Alarms or Manned Guarding or related sectors, which requires employees to be screened to BS7858 Standard, we can provide a fast and cost effective screening solution.

You may also want annual SIA Licence checks or have your TUPE affected staff security screened to BS7858 Standard.  Our electronic candidate report contains everything you need to satisfy your auditors and the Approved Contractor Scheme.

Our pricing structure is highly competitive, call us to discuss 0333 3326200

Download our BS7858 screening solution pricing and processes leaflet: CLICK HERE